A description of the comedy of errors as a comedy written by william shakespeare

Table of Contents Summary Egeon, a merchant of Syracuse, is condemned to death in Ephesus for violating the ban against travel between the two rival cities. As he is led to his execution, he tells the Ephesian Duke, Solinus, that he has come to Syracuse in search of his wife and one of his twin sons, who were separated from him 25 years ago in a shipwreck. The other twin, who grew up with Egeon, is also traveling the world in search of the missing half of their family. The twins, we learn, are identical, and each has an identical twin slave named Dromio.

A description of the comedy of errors as a comedy written by william shakespeare

First merchant — friend to Antipholus of Syracuse Second merchant — to whom Angelo is in debt Doctor Pinch — a conjuring schoolmaster Gaoler, Headsman, Officers, and other Attendants Synopsis[ edit ] Act I Because a law forbids merchants from Syracuse to enter Ephesus, elderly Syracusian trader Egeon faces execution when he is discovered in the city.

A description of the comedy of errors as a comedy written by william shakespeare

He can only escape by paying a fine of a thousand marks. He tells his sad story to Solinus, Duke of Ephesus. In his youth, Egeon married and had twin sons. On the same day, a poor woman without a job also gave birth to twin boys, and he purchased these as slaves to his sons.

Soon afterwards, the family made a sea voyage, and was hit by a tempest. Egeon lashed himself to the main-mast with one son and one slave, and his wife took the other two infants. His wife was rescued by one boat, Egeon by another.

Shakespeare's Comedy Plays: Comedy Plays By Shakespeare

Egeon never again saw his wife or the children with her. Recently his son Antipholus, now grown, and his son's slave Dromio left Syracuse to find their brothers. When Antipholus did not return, Egeon set out in search of him. The Duke is moved by this story, and grants Egeon one day to pay his fine.

That same day, Antipholus arrives in Ephesus, searching for his brother. He sends Dromio to deposit some money at The Centaur, an inn.

Shakespearean comedy - Wikipedia

He is confounded when the identical Dromio of Ephesus appears almost immediately, denying any knowledge of the money and asking him home to dinner, where his wife is waiting.

Antipholus, thinking his servant is making insubordinate jokes, beats Dromio of Ephesus. Act II Dromio of Ephesus returns to his mistress, Adriana, saying that her "husband" refused to come back to his house, and even pretended not to know her. Adriana, concerned that her husband's eye is straying, takes this news as confirmation of her suspicions.

Antipholus of Syracuse, who complains "I could not speak with Dromio since at first I sent him from the mart," meets up with Dromio of Syracuse who now denies making a "joke" about Antipholus having a wife.

Antipholus begins beating him. Suddenly, Adriana rushes up to Antipholus of Syracuse and begs him not to leave her. The Syracusans cannot but attribute these strange events to witchcraft, remarking that Ephesus is known as a warren for witches.

Antipholus and Dromio go off with this strange woman, the one to eat dinner and the other to keep the gate. Antipholus of Ephesus returns home and is refused entry to his own house. He is ready to break down the door, but his friends persuade him not to make a scene.

He decides, instead, to dine with a courtesan. After she exits, Dromio of Syracuse announces that he has discovered that he has a wife: Nell, a hideous kitchen-maid.

He describes her as "spherical, like a globe; I could find out countries in her". Antipholus jokingly asks him to identify the countries, leading to a witty exchange in which parts of her body are identified with nations.A list of all the characters in The Comedy of Errors.

The The Comedy of Errors characters covered include: Antipholus of Syracuse, Antipholus of Ephesus, Dromio of Syracuse, Dromio of Ephesus, Adriana, Luciana, Solinus, Egeon, Abbess, Balthasar, Angelo, Merchant, Second Merchant, Doctor Pinch, Luce, Courtesan. The Comedy of Errors is one of William Shakespeare's early plays.

It is his shortest and one of his most farcical comedies, with a major part of the humour coming from slapstick and mistaken identity, in addition to puns and word play. “We came into the world like brother and brother, And now let's go hand in hand, not one before another.” ― William Shakespeare, The Comedy of Errors.

The Comedy of Errors: Plot Summary From Stories of Shakespeare's Comedies by Helene Adeline Guerber. New York: Dodd, Mead and company. Act I This play opens in the palace of the Duke of Ephesus, while he is giving audience to a Syracusan merchant, who has come to this city not knowing a recent ordinance condemns all his countrymen to death.

Early Greek comedy was in sharp contrast to the dignity and seriousness of tragedy. Shakespeare’s Comedy Plays.

Audio Preview First merchant — friend to Antipholus of Syracuse Second merchant — to whom Angelo is in debt Doctor Pinch — a conjuring schoolmaster Gaoler, Headsman, Officers, and other Attendants Synopsis[ edit ] Act I Because a law forbids merchants from Syracuse to enter Ephesus, elderly Syracusian trader Egeon faces execution when he is discovered in the city.

All’s Well That Ends Well; The Comedy of Errors; As you Like It In Shakespeare terms the above text’s description of a comedy is pretty well-defined in general, the main point being the happy outcome for the good guys.

Description suite for orchestra Duration 10 From incidental music written for the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of William Shakespeare's 'The Comedy of Errors' First Performance FP: , Royal Shakespeare Theatre, Stratford-Upon-Avon, UK: Royal Shakespeare Company.