An analysis of the movie moulin rouge

An example of these is mise en scene, cinematography and editing to draw you into his film; the use of this makes a great story to a film about love. Baz Luhrman uses Mise en scene, the composition of setting and subject like properties, acting and lighting is used to great effect. Examples of this is Christians attic we see the subject surrounded in paper, bottles, clothes, candles, dust and dirt with Christians head in his arms.

An analysis of the movie moulin rouge

Analysis Most of the criticism of Moulin Rouge seems to indicate that the person speaking has significantly misunderstood the film.

An analysis of the movie moulin rouge

Perhaps the juxtaposition of unconventional style, techniques, objectives, etc. When used effectively, as I feel it is here, this sort of editing is very good at conveying emotions and feelings, over the plot and individual characters.

Now, not the whole film is edited in this manner, as in a narrative film this would be rather counter-productive, not to mention frustrating for the audience, but there are two significant sequences done this way: We also have the sequence edited in an intentionally confusing, overwhelming way where snippets of all the different things happening all collide with each other in a very kinetic way in an attempt to convey to the audience watching the film what it must have felt like to be there.

Also, remember, this story is being narrated to us by Christian who has just arrived in Montmartre, had his first taste of Absinthe, and been thrust into the world of the Moulin Rouge; completely overwhelmed, this is what it appears like to him.

This sequence does not advance the narrative in any significant way; it serves solely to introduce us to the underworld of the Moulin Rouge, making montage editing the better choice for conveying the feeling of the setting to the audience.

In fact, if you view this sequence in terms of continuity, it makes no sense at all. People jump from one place to another, then back again; at one point Zidler is in the sky above the Moulin Rouge, then in the garden, then back in the sky, where he falls towards the Moulin Rouge and back flips through the garden.

In the structure of a conventional narrative, this makes absolutely no sense, but in the context here, this style of editing, throwing convention and continuity to the wind, serves perfectly to express the sense of freedom and chaos at the Moulin Rouge.

The parallels between the Tango downstairs and the dinner with Satine and the Duke upstairs are brilliantly brought out as the tension builds. As the scene between Satine and the Duke escalates towards violence, the Tango becomes more and more violent, and the length of the shots becomes shorter and shorter.

Combined with the building music, this creates a great tension, which builds and builds, until all you see are shots of everyone yelling, then Chocolat punches the Duke, Nini falls to the ground, and the music stops.

Again, this sequence is in a large part an expression of the way Christian is feeling; there are major discontinuities in the shots of Satine and the Duke if you look closely—they go from eating at the table to kissing on the chaise lounge, back the table, etc. In the cuts between Christian and the Duke, there is a strong juxtaposition in their movements; a shot of Christian walking towards the camera might be followed by a shot of the Duke walking away from the camera, e.

Also, many of multitude of the dancing couples bear a rough, superficial resemblance to Satine and Christian: Again, this is done only rarely, mostly during songs.

Well, perhaps to emphasise that the lovers, too, are breaking the rules by falling in love, or maybe to emphasise their coming together they both appear on the same side of the screen Other examples: As a courtesan, Satine is always performing, and always creating her appearance to be what others want it to.

This need to look how others want her to is a defining characteristic of Satine as an object. But, when she falls in love with Christian, all this changes: When Satine has to really put on a show, though, when she really has to deny her true feelings and be convincing about it, this is signified by her wearing a veil: But, after this brief freedom, the bird in a gilded cage returns.

Symbolism in the Weather: Later, when jealousy has started to consume him, during the Tango, when Christian is standing below the Tower looking up at Satine and the Duke, time has progressed and it is now fall; there are brown leaves on the ground around Christian.

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This, of course, coincides with the breaking of the storm, complete with thunder and lightning, to tell us that something is wrong. Then, later that night, when Satine has died and the camera ascends through the roof of the Moulin Rouge, it is snowing out.

Snow, of course, covers things over, making them look, well, shiny and new. Then, the transition to spring as Christian completes his journey out of the underworld.Jun 01,  · The tragedy of the Moulin Rouge is that by the time you can afford a better seat, you've outgrown the show.

"Moulin Rouge" the movie is more like the Moulin Rouge of my adolescent fantasies than the real Moulin Rouge ever could be/5. Jun 01,  · "Moulin Rouge" the movie is more like the Moulin Rouge of my adolescent fantasies than the real Moulin Rouge ever could be.

It isn't about tired, decadent people, but about glorious romantics, who believe in the glitz and the tinsel--who see the nightclub not as a shabby tourist trap but as a stage for their dreams/5. Jun 01,  · The tragedy of the Moulin Rouge is that by the time you can afford a better seat, you've outgrown the show.

Moulin Rouge! - Wikipedia

"Moulin Rouge" the movie is more like the Moulin Rouge of my adolescent fantasies than the real Moulin Rouge ever could be/5. Feb 08,  · The setting of this love story is a small village in Paris, France and here is the “Moulin Rouge”, a nightclub of “midnight pleasures”. Baz Luhrman uses Mise en scene, the composition of setting and subject like properties, acting and lighting is used to great effect.

A Form to Story. You've reached the "hub" for any and all Dramatica analysis of Moulin Rouge!.In addition to the Storyform, you'll also find any additional analysis or media related to the story in question..

More Analysis → Mr. Smith Goes to Washington. Christian tries following her, but is denied entry to the Moulin Rouge, and becomes depressed, even though Toulouse insists that Satine does love him.

An analysis of the movie moulin rouge

The night of the show, Christian sneaks into the Moulin Rouge, intending to pay Satine her fee as a courtesan ("Hindi Sad Diamonds").

Sharon's Film Blog: Moulin Rouge! Critical Analysis